Fedora 36 is a great GNOME Distro! (Full Review)

Originally published at: Fedora 36 is a great GNOME Distro! (Full Review) – LearnLinuxTV

I run Fedora! With the gaining popularity of this awesome Linux distro, version 36 is the next stop in its plan for world domination! Okay, maybe that’s a bit too dramatic - Fedora may not be taking over the world, but it is taking the Linux world by storm lately! The May 2022 release of Fedora features GNOME 42, version 5.17 of the Linux kernel, and a tightly integrated GNOME experience. Check out the LearnLinuxTV review of Fedora 36 to see what’s new this time around!

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As tribal as it is, I’m glad to see the distro I use pass muster. Riding the recent wave of Fedora love, lol.

I like to believe that Wendell popularized it a few years ago when he said that he and Linus Torvalds are using Fedora. And he did a lot of guides on it, probably the most popular being the GPU passthrough. And then its popularity starting growing like wildfire and keeps on going up.

I don’t remember what versions I used, I think between Fedora 25 and 33 or 34. And I only stopped because I quit my job, I had it on my work laptop and I did not have another device to install it on. It was a nice distro, with a bit of bad quirks until 28 or 29, then it started getting really good. Up to this day, I find Fedora to be the best distro for most people and for most uses, far better than Ubuntu, Pop!_OS or Manjaro.

And Fedora, like Ubuntu, is really flexible and can take many forms, like a gaming desktop, productivity workstation, minimal stable server, bleeding-edge server, web development PC or anything in-between. Fedora is also the only systemd distro that I approve of, systemd has never given me any headaches at all on Fedora, unlike Debian, Ubuntu and especially Manjaro. This is not to say those distros are bad (ok, Manjaro is bad, if you’re going to use something, use either Artix, Arch, or if you want an easy install, Garuda).

I would use Fedora if I had the opportunity. Maybe in a container, but I’d like to keep my infrastructure as similar as possible, so no mix and matching OS unless really, really necessary or for security purposes.

What distro are you using right now?

Yeah, I don’t know how long Fedora has been increasing in popularity though I think it’s been for a few versions now. I was more referring to the recent trend on YouTube in the last month or so of YouTubers being like “Fedora is good actually”. Techlore pokes fun at this in their video on Fedora, lol.

In general it seems to be a great option for stability, relative ease of use, and pushing forward technologies under the hood. Jay mentioned in his video that they don’t really have any flashy features, but having something like Wayland support by default is something that will push the Linux community forward in the long-run. Not to imply that he doesn’t see that - I’m sure he does.

Void, Alpine and I’ll be going for OpenBSD for my router.

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Off-topic question:

pfSense or just plain OpenBSD?

Both OpnSense and pfSense run on OpenBSD.

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True, but you could run *BSD as a router without the pfSense/OPNsense frontend.

As a side note, OPNsense uses HardenedBSD, a fork of FreeBSD.
https://docs.opnsense.org/relations/hardenedbsd.html

And pfSense uses FreeBSD as well (probably not HardenedBSD).
https://docs.netgate.com/pfsense/en/latest/releases/versions.html

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FreeBSD, I keep forgetting which one they base from, too… :slight_smile:

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Not any more, OPNsense moved to FreeBSD in Jan or Feb of this year.

Edit: It has been rock solid, I updated as soon as it was released and had no porting (or other) issues.

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OpenBSD on the RockPro64, which will be my router.

pfSense runs on FreeBSD. OPNsense used to run on a fork of FreeBSD called HardenedBSD, which is still basically FreeBSD, but moved back.

Yeah, this ^

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Ha, well I don’t know all the BSD varieties I guess. :smile_cat: :penguin:

We have OPNsense on our router and it works really well and even I can use its nice interface.

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